Monday, June 22, 2015

Parque México gets a Facelift


Parque México, an oasis in the heart of Colonia Condesa, is one of the loveliest spots in all of Mexico City--and one of the greenest places in town, too, with lots towering palms and banana trees, some now almost 100 years old, providing shade along the meandering pathways.  

After years of delays, the chipped and faded paint, crumbling columns and grafitti-covered walls of the Foro Lindbergh, the large public space that lies in the middle of Parque México, have finally been repaired. There's also  new area for the colonia's many pampered dogs, and some new playground equipment for the kids. 

It's a great place for moment of tranquility during the week. On weekends things get livelier with frequent music events, outdoor movies, tango classes and more. If you've just spent an hour in traffic on the periferico and are hating Mexico City this place is the perfect antidote. 



A shady walkway



Hanging out in the Foro Lindbergh



new lanterns, old cactus detail


junk food




To see more photos of Parque Mexico click the link below:

https://plus.google.com/photos/104722146490116474060/albums/6137756065460626337

Walking Tour #9 in the new edition of my book leads you in and around Parque Mexico. For a free copy of the tour write to me at jimjohnstonart@gmail.com--or buy the book (with 3 more walking tours of Colonia Condesa) on Amazon--click HERE.

Monday, June 15, 2015

MAN VS. NATURE: A Tree Grows in Mexico City

Tree #1: Colonia Condesa 



Mexico City has been called the city of survivors, and for many of us who live here, there's a bittersweet pleasure in thriving in the midst of all the urban chaos. Overpopulation, scarcity of oxygen, earth tremors, the possibility of Popocatepetl blowing its top and covering us in molten lava--you call those problems? We're a tough breed here. By necessity, our roots must reach well below the surface of things. 
Nowhere is a metaphor of that struggle to survive more perfectly expressed than in many of the city's trees, where the contest between man and nature is in constant, slow motion display. Every time I see one of these guys, it gives me strength to soldier on. 
This is the first of a proposed series of photos honoring Mexico City's trees. I welcome submissions from my readers for their favorite champion trees.